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- Illustrated Catalogue aid Price List 





^Gladding, McBean & Co.>* 








Stone Ware Water Pipe, Terra- Cotta 
Chimney Pipe, Plain and Orna- 
mental Terra- Cotta Work, 

Architectural Terra,- Cotta, 




Chimney Tops, 
Lawn Vases, 
Flower Pots, 
Drain Tile, 
Culvert Pipe, 
Well Tubing, 



Fire Brick, 
Fire Tile. 
Fire Clay, 
Stove Linings, 
Acid Roveivers, 
Acid Crocks. 



Manufactory at Lincoln, Placer County Cal. 



(Liucoln Hon thi 
it milc% i 



_JJ 



San Francisco Office and Depot, 

1358 ^ 1360 MARKET SC. 



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TO THE TRADE. 



We herewith hand you a brief Catalogue of the 
principal articles manufactured by us, giving also 
sufficient illustrations of the same to enable those who 
are not familiar with such goods to make their 
orders under standingly. Should you require any- 
thing in our line, which is not specified herein, send 
us a full description and drawing of the article re- 
quired, and in all probability we can furnish it with 
reasonable dispatch. 

Every description of Architectural aud Decorative 
Terra Gotta work made to order. 

You are invited to inspect our Works, which have 
been recently enlarged. A visit will convince you 
that our present facilities and experienced workmen, 
enable us to fill orders promptly and with satisfaction 
to all parlies. 

Thankful for your past patronage, and promising 
increased efforts to turn out satisfactory work, we 
solidi a continuance of your trade. 

Respectfully, 

GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 

S3£* A liberal discount to the trade. 



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J 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



STANDARD PATTERNS OF SEWER PIPE. 



8m Price Lint of Sewer Pi pe and Fittings on page 6, and directions 
for Ujing sower* on page 9 - 

FlE. 1. Fig. *. Flft. 3. 






Sewer Pipe.— We make our Sewer Pipe with sockets, two feet in 
length, and 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 10, 18 and 24 inches inside diameter. 

T and T Branches.— Our branches are made in two-foot lengths, 
with either Y or T inlets.* The inlets on 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10-inch pipe 
can be of any of these sizes, but not exceeding the n.aiu in diameter; 
thus, on a 6-lnch pipe the inlets can be 3, 4, 5 or 0-inch, and on a 10- 
incb pipe, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 or 10-iuch. 

The inlets on 12, 14, 16, 18 and 24-inch pipe are one size smaller than 
the main, and not smaller than 6 inches, unless made to order; thus 
on 18-inch pipe are 0, 8, 10, 12, 14 or 16-f nch. 

y inlets should bo used wherever practicable, bo that the two cur- 
rents niay flow In the same direction. A T branch tends to form ed- 
dies, and consequently deposits in the main sewer. 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



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FiB. 5. 



FIB. 4. 





Elbows.— Elbows {£ of a circle) of 3, 4, 5, 0, 8, 10 and 12 inches in 
diameter, are always kept in stock, and larger sizes are made to order, 

Curves, — Curves (i of a circle) of 3, 4, 5, C, 8, 10, 12 and 14 inches in 
diameter, are always kept in stock, and larger sizes are made to order. 



F1 B . C. 



fjji§ 



ip 




Fie 8. 

mm 



Reducers and Increasers. — These are used to reduce or increase 
the size of sewers. When ordering, give the inside diameter at lioth 
ends, also on which end (small or large) the socket is required. If this 
is done, there will he no mistakes made in filling orders. We endeavor 
to keep in stock all sizes. 

Slants. — In the construction of a brick sewer, slants should be 
built into the wall, to receive the lateral or side sewers, the bevel of 
the slant being flush with the inside of (the main sewer, thus forming 
a Y branch. 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



-M 



Ms. 10. 




P Traps.— This trap Is used to form a trap with a perpendicular 

horizontal pipe at the upper end of the sewer, or under the bowl 

, he soil from the hopper falls directly into the wa- 

1 will not adhere. t.» the pipe. This trap has the advantage of a 

, . it in dislodging solid matter. 

We make these of 3, 4, r> and G-inch diameter; the 4, 5 and G-iuch 

With 4-inch hand holes, if desired. 

S Traps. —An 3 trap is used to form a trapjwith two perpendicular 
pipes, in the upper stories of buildings. They have the sameadvan- 
tages as the P trap over the other forms. We make these of 4-iucb di- 
wlth 4-inch hand holes, if desired. 



Fi 3 . ii. 




Hand Hole Traps.— We make these of 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10-inch di- 
ameter, with hand holes or fresh-air inlets. When the sewor is deep, 
the hand hoU can be lengthened by placing one or more pieces of pipe 
of the requisite niz* upon the hand hole of the trap, through which the 
trap can be cleansed when desired. A stick occasionally inserted in 
the hand hole and the sediment stirred when water is running through 
tlie trap, will prevent obstruction. 

Our 4, 5. 6, 8 and lU-inch traps are provided with 4-inch hand holes, 
and the 3-inch traps with 3-inch hand hole. 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



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Our "Second Quality" Sewer Pipe. 

To Ballrmwl (otu|Utnlr«, < ountr < onimlstlom r*. City Anthor- 
itlr*. < i\H HihnfUi Builder*. Contractor*, lnrmen, 
■ ml to nil « h.ini II May Concern. 

Through the process of bnrnlng, some of tbo pipes are liable to 

blister, crack, or lose their perfect form, which renders thorn unfit for 

rs. In which all manner of filth is conducted; bii{ 

'or drainage of ordinary 

Cttftca and Vtirai Swamp Lands, Culverts for Railroads. 

Hi>a«l»:i>-. and Linings for WeHa, 
They answer the purpose, and can be bought at a much less price. 
[ See price list on this page.] 



Price List of Second-Class Iron Stone Sewer Pipe. 



CALIBER 


PRICE 


AREA 


WEIGHT 


FEET TO 


or 


PER 


IX 


PER 


CARLOADOF 


PIPE. 


FOOT. 


IXCHEH. 


FOOT. 


10 TONS. 


8 inch. 




501 


21 lbs. 


950 


10 inch. 




78} 


32 lbs. 


630 


12 inch. 




113 


42 lbs. 


480 


14 inch. 




154 


50 lbs. 


400 


Hi inch. 




201 


63 lbs. 


320 


18 inch. 




254} 


72 lbs. 


280 


24 inch. 




452} 


105 lbs. 


190 





Water Closet Bowl. Slop Hopper. 

Price and Size of Water Closet Bowls. 

No. 1, Depth, 9 inches, Width, 13 inches, Price, 
„ ._, .. io « " 15 

" 3, " 14 " " 15 

Price and Size of Slop Hoppers. 
Depth, 9 inches, Width, 13 inches, Price, cents. 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Directions for Laying Sewer Pipe. 

Kxravatlnn and Inclination. <".»mmence at the lower end or 
ontlrt of the proposed drain or ppwrr, :.ud make the trench of m 
gradual and continuous Inclination, anl as great as attau 

istrfhuting the whole avail-ibis fall over the total lengtt 
drain a much better grade will tie second, A fall of 1 In 40 to 1 in 00, J* 
desirable for pl|wvt of 4 tot* InchM In diameter, and greater if attainable. 
A gTade of 1 In 100 Is tbe leant that should be given to small bonso 
dralnt. In order to make them self-cleatmlng. Larger pipes rvquiro 
leas Inclination. After bringing the bottom of the trench to a true, 
uniform grail- Jal grooves or depressions for the bo< 

• larger sites of pipe, say all over 8 Inches In diameter, excavate 
a very narrow trench in tbe middle of the ditch about G inches wide, 
and 3 to A Inches deep, so that the body of the pipe will rest firmly on 
the ground. This pipe will sustain the greatest amount of vertical 
pressure when It has a firm and uniform bearing at every point in its 
lower surface. 

Mode of laying-. — Commence laying the pipe at the outlet with 
the sockets all facing up grade, fair and true to line, and upon founda- 
tions of assured stability. Do not lay boards iu tbe bottom of the 
i, on which to lay the pipe. Tbe ends of each length of pipe 
should abut squarely and truly against the adjoining pieces, so as to 
present an absolute continuity and uniformity in the Interior of the 
drain, particularly at the bottom line. The annular space between the 
spigot and socket ends of the pipe, should be completely filled with 
hydraulic cement mortar, paying particular attention to the bottom 
part of the joint, where the mortar should be pressed into it with the 
.fingers. 

Cement Mortar. —A cement mortar, good enough for all ordinary 
use, can be made of one part hydraulic cement (Portland is the best) 
to two parts of clean, sharp sand, free from loam or soil, and fresh 
made, as wanted for the work In hand, Tbe mortar should be used im- 
mediately after being mixed, and not allowed to stand upon the mor- 
tarboards until it has set, and then be broken down, re-mixed or re. 
tempered, so-called. Never use any lime in the mixture. 

Cleaning 1 Pipe.— As the work progresses and each length of pipe 
Is permanently fixed In place, the Interior should be thoroughly 
cleansed and wiped out, and all projecting mortar or other substance 
carefully removed, so that tbe internal area of the drain will be left 
abiolutelg unobstructed, smooth and clean throughout its entire length, as 
otherwise the rough projecting points of mortar, when hardened, might 
catch any waste matter passing through the pipe, and gradually ob- 
struct its discharge. 

Fllllnjr.— As fast as the filling is deposited In the trench (sand or 
fine dirt first), itshould be thoroughly puddled and tamped, especially 
under and around the lower half of tbe pipe, and to sucb an extent 
as to render the subsequent settlement of tbe surface practically im- 
possible. 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



WeRWe 



We wish to especially call your attention to owr Stone 
Ware Water Pipe, -which is extensively used on this coast 
for conducting water. 

This Pipe is made with Sockets, in two-foot lengths, which 
should be well cemented together with Portland cement, and 
clean, sharp sand (free from loam or soil) mixed in equal 
parts, and from eight to ten days time should be allowed for 
the cement to thoroughly harden before the Pipe is covered^ 
or water is allowed to pass through it. 

Water should not be turned off at outlet, but at the head 
or point of supply. 

Place on line of Pipe, especially where there are depres- 
sions, a stand pipe, with a removable cap, so that it can be 
used, when desired, as an air escape. 

If the above directions are strictly followed the Pipe will 
stand a pressure or head of sixty feet. 

Notice. — See fuller directions for laying Pipe, on page 9. 
Price List of Stone Ware Water Pipe. 



CALIBER 


FBICE OF 


BRANCHES 


WEIGHT OF 


FEET TO 


OF 


PIPE 


PIPE 


CABLOAD OF 


PIPE. 


PEE FOOT. 




PEE FOOT. 


10 TONS, 


3 inch. 






6J lbs. 


3100 


4 inch. 






10 lbs. 


2000 


5 inch. 






14 lbs. 


1430 


6 inch. 






16 lbs. 


1250 


8 inch. 






21 lbs. 


950 


10 inch. 






32 lbs. 


630 


12 inch. 






42 lbs. 


480 


14 inch. 






50 lbs. 


400 


16 inch. 






63 lbs. 


320 


18 inch. 






72 lbs. 


280 


24 inch. 






105 lbs. 


190 



Special Prices quoted on car-load lots. 



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10 



GLADDING. McBEAN ft CO., 



-+< 




Price List of Grease Traps. 



Nnraber. 


Price. 


Inside Diameter. 


Depth. 


1 




12 inches. 
18 inches. 


14 inches. 
16 inches. 



.11 the attention of Architects, Contractors, Masons, Plumbers 
and all persons who lay drains, to the above invention for preventing 
the fouling and obstruction of sewers and drains by the deposit of 
grease therein. 

The most common and the moat certain cause of obstruction to house- 
l'rom grease, which, though fluid when hot, soon cools in 
the drains, and gradually, bnt certainly, closes them up. We have 
known drains from thirty to fifty feet in length closed nearly the 
whole distance from this cause. The amount which will collect from 
^te of a single family is surprising to those who are not familiar 
with the subject. It ordinarily causes much more expense and Incon- 
venience to allow this substance to run into the drain than to catch it 
in a grease-trap, from which it can conveniently be removed. 

This method of catching the grease keeps the sewer clean, and by not 
kitting it to enter the sewer, of course does away with the possi- 
bility of decomposition of thin substance, thus disposing effectually of 
one of the most active agents in creating that poisonous SEWER 
GAS BO dangerous to health. 

We earnestly recommend the use of above trap in all drains leading 
from sinks in kitchens, as it will be found thoroughly effective in its 
operation. 

Place as near the kitchen sink as possible, so that there shall be the 
least practicable length of pipe to accumulate grease. 

They are made of the same material as our sewer pipe. 



n 



igt : igi 

GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



CULVERT PIPE. 



Stoneware Pipes are extensively used for railroad culverts, and have 
been for the last twenty years, and we desire to call the attention of 
county road commissioners, supervisors, and overseers of common wagon 
roads throughout the country, to the use of these pipes for culverts 
across common roads, in place of all small plank bridges and box culverts, 
so common in country roads, and which are constantly getting out of 
repair, and last at most but a few years; whereas, a Stoneware Pipe cul- 
vert will last for ages without any repairs whatever, if well put in, and 
will prove cheapest in the long run, as well as best. 

The construction of a pipe culvert is a very simple matter, but 
should nevertheless be done with care. Follow the directions on page 
15 to the letter, and the result will repay the labor. If the top of the 
pipe, when laid, is less than two feet below the surface of the road- 
bed, first cover the pipes with dirt to the depth of a few inches and 
level it off, then place a. few poles, fence rails or planks over the pipes 
lengthwise, and throw on more dirt and grade up to the level of the 
road-bed. The rails or poles will serve to equalize the pressure on the 
pipes when the wheels of heavy wagons pass over them; but if the 
dirt is two feet deep or more no other .protection is necessary. The 
ends of the culvert should be protected by email abutments of stone 
or plank, as shown on page 13 otherwise the end pipes would be liable 
to be undermined by the action of the water, or displaced by thirsty 
hogs in search of water to drink or wollow in. The size of pipe re- 
quired in each particular case depends of course upon the amount of 
water to be provided for, and this depends upon the area of ground 
from which the rainfall runs to the culvert. This area can generally 
be estimated with sufficient accuracy, by careful observation, without 
surveying instruments, and the size required can then be determined 
by reference to table on page 8 "When there is any doubt as 

to the proper size it is better, of course, to put in one larger than 
is necessary rather than too small. 

We have had a few calls for pipes as small as six inches for this pur- 
pose, but the sizes most used range from 8 to 18 inches for turnpikes, 
wagon roads, plantation culverts, and street crossings, and from 12 to 
24 inches for railroads. Our second-class pipe is well adapted for thia 
purpose. 

Orders by mail promptly attended to, and shipments made to all 
points accessible by wat«r or railroad. 

[For Pricei see pages 6 and 7.] 
* — % 

12 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 




nd of a pipe culvert, protected by a small 

-1,. Tbe foundation should of course extend 

grouud to be below the influence of frost, as 

ling might throw the end pipe 

brick abutments are too expensive, a 



out of posi 

good and cheap snl a made of planks, by setting them 

on end, de«p enough in the ground to hold them in place, and fitting 
them closely about ti Ml better by setting a post each side 

of the pipe, [Bee Fig. 13) and by spiking the planks on horizontally, as 
represented below. 

When planks or post* are used it is best to set them with considerable 
inclination toward the road* bed to prevent the pressure of the embank- 
ment from crowding the planks outward. 



Fig. 1.1. 




13 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



SUB-IRRIGATION AND 






Your attention is called to our Vitrif.ed Tile, which are exten- 
sively used on this coast, for the J3ra.ijxa.ge or Sub-Ir ligation of 
landB. 

Our Tile are manufactured without sockets or collars, in one foot 
lengths, and are laid in the trench with their ends joined as closely as 
possible. If to be used for Drainage, the water will enter where the 
ends of Tile meet, and if for Irrigation, it will escape at the same 
points. 

We take it for granted that a few suggestions as to the form and 
quality of tile best suited to the purpose may not be out of place. 
First as to form— the round tiles are undoubtedly the beat, because 
they can be laid any side up, and thus a close joint can be secured 
with much less trouble than with flat bottom or horse shoe tile, espec- 
ially if a little out of shape. It is not well to use those which have 
been drawn out of shape by excessive heat in burning. 

As to quality, tile Bhould be made of good fire-clay, andhard burned 
— the more like stoneware the better. Such tile are of unusual strength, 
which materially reduce the breakage and expense of transportation. 

Too much stress cannot he laid upon the importance of using hard 
burnt tile only, as the failure of a single tile may work extensive 
mischief. 

Tile should be smooth on the inside, as the friction will be less. 

The old-fashioned notion that drain-tile should he porous in order to 
absorb the water was an error. The water enters the drain at the 
joints, and nowhere else, to any appreciable extent. 

The tile made of common brick clay at various places throughout the 
country, is a good deal better than nothing; but when good, solid, 
hard-burned tile made of fire-clay, can be obtained at about the same 
price, it is a great mistake to use the soft porous tile. The farmer can- 
not afford to use inferior tile ; he wants only what is reliable, and will 
be of permanent value. 

"We claim all the above advantages for our Tile. 



*" 



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14 



<i> 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



Drain Tile and Fittings. 

SHU 



Price List. 









Price 


Weigh! 






of 


of 


of 


of 


Carload 


1 per 


Branches, 


Curved. 


Reducers, 


Tile. 


of 


1,000 ft. 








per foot. 


10 tons. 




cents. 


:) u.s. 


7(KH> 


3 Inch. ! 


cents. 




cents. 


4', lbs 


4500 


4 inch. 


cents. 


cents. 


cents. 


63 u.s. 


3000 


5 inch. 


cents. 


cents. 


cents. 


8 lbs. 


2500 


6 iuch. 1 


cents. 


cents. 


cents. 


11 lbs. 


1900 


8 inch. 


cents. 


cents. 


rents. 


174 lbs. 


1150 



'• e— The above prices quoted for tile are tor tile on the cars at 
our manufactory, , Lincoln, PI* I I 

1 by the carload will be subject uot only to a Bpecial 
price, but a special rate of freight as well. 

Table Showing the Quantity of Rainfall Per Acre, 



Id depth of rain. 


Cubic feel per acre. 


Gallons per acre. 


.1 


3G3 


2,715 


.15 


544.', 


4,073 


.2 


726 


5,430 


.25 


907J 


6,788 


:.i 


1,089 


8,146 


.35 


1,270* 


9,503 


.4 


1,452 


10,861 


.45 


1.633J 


12,219 


.5 


1,815 


13,577 


.55 


1,996} 


14,934 


.6 


2,178 


16,292 


.(;.-> 


2, 359 J 


17,650 


.7 


2,541 


19,007 


.75 


2,722} 


20,365 


.8 


2,904 


21,723 


.85 


3,085* 


23,081 


.9 


3,267 


24,438 


.95 


3,448* 


25,796 


1.0 


3,630 


27,154 



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15 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



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FIRE BRICK. 



Sqnare. Per 1,000, $. 



Arch. Per 1000, $. 



Split. Per 1000, $. 



\T/ I Large Key. Per 1000, $ . 

FIRE CLAY. 

Ciude, in bulk, per ton, - - % 

Finely Ground, in bulk, per ton, - 

Finely ground, (in sacks), per bbl. of 300 lbs 

When the ground clay is furnished in car-load lots, sacked, 
we charge the market price for the sacks, unless they are 
returned to us in good condition. 

*Price according to quantity and point of delivery. 



#- 



16 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



FIRE TILE. 




I R«- 


Damn 


PBKI. 1 






Hx 8x1 in ■ 


** 






BxS inches. 








10x10x2 inches. 








12x12x2 inches. 




Square 




15x15x2 iiu 






edge. 


16xlGx2 inches. 




. 




18x18x2 inches. 








12x 6x3 inches. 








14x 6x2 inches. 








16x 6x2 inches. 








lSx 6xfi inches. 








24x12x2 inches. 




Sfinare 




2-1x1-1x2 inches. 




Square 


■ 


24x15x2 inches. 




Square 




38x14x2 incb 




Square 


■ 


20x15x3 inches. 




Square 


edge. 


20x16x3 inches. 




Square 




24x12x3 inches. 




Square 




18x 6x6 inches. 




Square 


edge. 


21x 6x5 inches. 




Square 




l^x tlx6 inches. 




Square 


■ 


20x 6x6 inches. 






FORM. 


UMENSIOHS. 


PRICE EACH. 


Flaugcd t ii 
Flan 

Flanged edge. 
Flanged edge. 

Finn" i 


20x12x3 incheB. 
30x15x3 inches. 
30x16x3 inches. 
36x15x3 inches. 

36x16x3 inches. 


*$ 



'Price according to quantity. 

Any size or shape not in this Catalogue can be made to 
order at short notice. 



17 



r 



->< 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



Terra-Cotta Thimbles. 




For forming tlie stove pipe holes in brick chimneys. More durable 
and safer than the common sheet iron. 
As they do not contract or expand, the plaster will remain smooth, 

Price List of Thimbles. 



DIAMETER. 


LENGTH. 


PBIOE. 


4 inches. 


4 inches. 


cents. 


6 inches. 


4 inches. 


cents. 


6 inches. 


6 inches. 


cents. 


5 inches. 


8 inches. 


cents. 


5 inches. 


10 inches. 


cents. 


5 inches. 


12 inches. 


cents. 


6 inches. 


4 inches. 


cents. 


6 Inches. 


6 inches. 


cents. 


6 inches. 


8 inches. 


cents. 


6 inches. 


10 inches. 


cents. 


6 inches. 


12 inches. 


cents. 



Terra-Cotta Starting Plates. 





With Hole. 



Solid. 



Price each, cents. 

We beep in stock these plates of two sizes, 12 x 12 and 14 x 14 inches, 
solid or with holes, and suitable as supports for our six and eight- 
inch chimney pipe. Fire Tile, 10x10x2 inches, is a suitable size for 
our five-inch chimney pipe. Price, cents. 



18 



-* 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Terra-Cotta Chimney Pipe. 



introducing our improved Terra- 

lmve come 

!-! few years, especially 

Bp, and they have given 

Among the advantages are: 

They are made of the best prepared Fire Clay, a 
portion of which . and does not contract and ex- 

pand hy heat ami cold, thus making the most durable and 
perfect Chimney Flue known. 

2d. They are cheaper than brick by one-half. 

They axe smooth, and soot does not stick to them, 
as in the case with brick flues. In fact, pipes make a more 
perfect chimney than bricks, a smooth round bore being 
the Iwst possible form for a smoke-flue. 

4th. They are safer thau brick flues. By referring, to 

the illustration it will be seen that by filling the socket 

with cement, it will form a solid flue from starting point to 

They do not require a mechanic to put them up, but 

can be erected by a person of ordinary intelligence. Care 

■■'■ mortar, as 
upon ■'■■ They are very much lighter 

than 1 i _4it of G inch pipe is only 16 pounds per 

foot); need no foundation or support, and do not spring 
the joists. All lengths are made" two feet, unless otherwise 
ordered. 



19 



t.t- 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe and Fittings. 



w Jv 




Wf ^^^ 



its 



■ 



-JIP 



^P 




H 



o 

Q 


u c a £ 
Cm 


I — c 

ti 

o 


as 

o o 


ll 


si 

o 


r'S'S 


Weight of Pipe 
Per Foot. 




5 Inch. 

6 inch. 
8 inch. 


cts. 
cts. 

cts. 


s 


$ 


3 


3 


3 


14 lbs. 
16 lbs. 

21 lbs. 



NOTE.— Our Chimney Pipe, Openings, and Bottom Pipe are furnished in 
2-foot lengths. Shorter or longer lengths (up to 4 feet) and larger sizes, <an 
be furnished on short notice. 

jISTSee Directions for Erecting Pipe Chimneys on pages 21, 22 and 23, 



*- 



20 



"* 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



-M 



<rb 




r SH0WIN0 MODE 

GLADDING 
TERRA COTTA 




CHIMNEY CAR 



-ROOF PLATE 



OF ERECTING 

McBEAN&CO'S 
PIPE CHIMNEYS.' 




*- 



•21 



-* 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



"* 



Directions for Erecting Terra _Cotta» Pipe 
Chimneys. 



it- 



Mode of Erecting. — Tbe pipes should be set with their socket 
ends up (more especially for inside work), as this gives the best oppor- 
tunity of making the joints tight, and prevents the mortar from drop- 
ping out. Especial care should be taken to completely fill the annu- 
lar space between the spigot and socket ends of the pipe with mortar, 
as upon that depends the chimney's safety. Carefully remove from 
inside of the pipe all projecting mortar before it hardens. Where 
joints are made above the roof, as illustrated in chimney 1, or when 
chimneys are erected on the outside of a building, great care should 
be taken to properly fill the joints with hydraulic cement mortar, and 
Blope the cement filling from tbe pipe to outside of socket, so that the 
water will drain off and not enter the chimney through any defective 
filling. 

In districts where considerable rain falls, it might be advisable 
where chimneys are erected on the outside of a building, to reverse or 
erect with the sockets down, as illustrated in chimney 1. This will 
certainly prevent water from entering at the joints, even should tbe 
mortar and workmanship be poor. 

These chimneys can be enclosed, with lath and plaster, or other ma- 
terials, the same as a flue of brick. 

Size of Pipe. — The five-inch pipe is mostly used for parlor and 
other small stoves; the six-inch for ranges, cooking stoves and ordi- 
nary sized fire-places ; tbe eight-inch for extra large fire-places (such 
as used in country houses), or where more than one stove is to be con- 
nected with the chimney; also for small furnaces. Any chimney will 
give better satisfaction if only one stove is connected with it. 
■ What we call 5, G and 8-inch Chimney Pipe really measures inter- 
nally 5£, 6J and 8£ inches. 

We keep in stock at all times, the 5, 6 and 8-inch, with the necessary 
fittings, and frequently have on hand 10 and 12-inch, and can make 
any size, up to 24-inch, on short notice. 

Pipe without Sockets. — If you erect the chimney with the 
socket ends up, which is tbe proper mode, and desire to finish with a 
cap or top, the last or top pipe on the chimney must be without a 
socket, so that tbe cap or top will fit over it. 

Occasionally in transit a length of pipe may have a piece broken out 
of the socket ; in this event, knock off the remainder of socket, or if 
"broken below that point, cut tbe pipe off evenly with a hatchet, chisel 
or Baw, and use it for a top pipe. 

Openings or Ts. — Our chimney Ts are made one and two feet In 
length, with openings 2 to 8$ inches in length; the latter are of suffi- 
cient length to pass through the side or partition of a building, as 
illustrated in chimneys 1 and 3. If you desire to connect two stoves 
with one chimney, below the ceiling, as illustrated in chimney 3, you 
would require two Ts, each a foot in length, one with an opening of 
sufficient length to pass through the partition. Double Ts. or two 
openings on one pipe, are sometimes used, but it is preferable to use 
the two short Ts, because the openings can be turned in any direction 
desired. 

"We make the openings of the following sizes, viz. : on the 5-iuch 
pipe, 6-inch; on the 6-inch pipe, 5 and 6-inch ; and on the 8-inch pipe, 
5, 6 and 8-inch openings. 

Bottom Pipe. — Bottom Pipe are used where you wish to start a 
chimney in the middle of a room, or at some point where it is not con- 
venient or desirable to construct a shelf. The projecting rim is made 
to rest on the ceiling, joists, or any support erected for the purpose, 
and is of sufficient strength to carry the weight of 25 feet of pipe. 



22 



-» 4 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Elbowi. —Elbows (M« fig. 4, page 4> are rarrly used In the con- 

a of pipe chimneys, 
Thlmhlr*. >!i ill you desire to reduce tbo size of the opening. 
Thin. thus: 5-Inch opening* i 

redo. ' I'liimble, and In like luanner 

a 6 to 5-lDcb and 81 th a 6-lnch Thtiulile. 

Iron IIIul. ■ !- Iron Ring* -suitably for holding 

■ ■'.■'• or tin bauds will serve tht 
pose, and at 
Tin Colli* i * i<**see through a roof, celling, par- 

circular opening should be at least 
itside diameter of the pipe, around wsrich 
itted to it, a tin or sbeeMron collar, 
r ceiling. When a tin collarisused 
where tbe pipe passes through the roof, hydraulic cement mortar 
1 be used In connection with it, so as to make It perfectly tight 
and prevent leakage. 

Iron Roof Plato*. — A roof plate (as illustrated in chimney 2) 

I -htly flaring at the top, so as to give sufficient space around the 

Iraullc cement mortar. The upper, or side 

nearest to peak of roof, should he placed under the sbin- 

it water from running under and down the pipe 

■ 

ran of roof plate, and one which we can highly recom- 
mend. Is Illustrated In chimney 4. Instead of placing a pipe without 
a socket on the top of chimney, it is placed one length lower, and one 
with a socket substituted, and placed with the socket end down and 
- the roof plate and pipe. 
In tin ■ roof plate/must encircle tbe pipe closely. Any 

of the tops described on pages 2?, 30. 31, 33 and 33 will fit over tbe 
different sizes of our Chimney Pipe with tbe roof plate encircling it. 

Starling* Plates.— Starting Plates can be of Terra Cotta. Iron or 
Wood. Place on either of these plates a layer of mortar, one or two 
, into which the pipe should be pressed ; also, place 
inside at bottom of the pipe more mortar, especially If a wooden plate 
Is used. A common and secure way, is to lay a couple of courses of 
brick work on a wooden starting plate or shelf, on which to rest the 
pipe. 

With one of our hole starting plates, the chimney can easily be 
cleaned. The hole can be closed with a cover, similar to those used to 
close stove-pipe holes in brick chimneys. 

Mortar. —Either of the following mortars will answer for inside 

work: ordinary lime mortar; lime mortar and hydraulic cementmixed; 

or one part hydraulic cement to two parts clean sharp sand. For work 

. exposed to the weather, use tbe hydraulic cement and sand, and use 

as soon as mixed. 

Wooden Base. —A wooden base built into the roof, as illustrated 
In chimney 4, with the pipe extending 6 to 12 inches above the top of 
I base, on which and over the pipe is placed one of our Ohimney 
Tops, would be ornamental and a fine finish to the chimney, and pre- 
vent rain from entering. 

Another style would be to extend the pipe above the top of wooden 
base, 2 or it feet < we keep in stock for this purpose, pipe without sock- 
ets. 3 and 4 feet iu length*, and slide down over it one of the bases, 
Nos. 104 to 106, described on page 27, and place on top of the pipe a 
cap, such as described on page 26. This will give you a solid chimney 
from tbe starting point to top. Place on top of tbe wooden base a layer 
of cement mortar, a couple of inches in thickness, and press tbe top 
or base into it. If one of our No. 104 to 106 bases is used, place a 
filling of hydraulic cement mortar around the top, where It connects 
with tbe pipe. 

* * 

23 



*- 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



TERRA COTTA 



Y_CHlMME£=aB^ 






At tlie East very few first class houses, either public or 
private, are now built without Terra Cotta flue linings, either 
round or square, (round is the best for draught) for each 
smoke flue in the chimneys, thus effectually protecting the 
buildings against fires. Our flues are made of the best firo 
clay; They cannot rust or decay; do not choke up or burn 
out; are non-conductors of heat; make a smooth, continu- 
ous flue, with good draught; and avoid dangers caused by 
defective flues. A chimney, as ordinarily constructed, has on 
the inside a thin coating of lime mortar to make it smooth. 
In a few years the action of the heat and gases from 
coal cause the mortar lining and mortar in the joints to fall 
off, especially when the soot in the chimney burns out, then 
there remains a small opening in the brick work, through 
which there is always a draught. The heat from the chim- 
ney passes through this hole, and sets fire to the adjacent 
wood-work. This is the origin of fires from defective lines, 
from which cause not less than twenty-five per cent, of our 
fires occur. 

These flue linings are also very generally used for hot air* 
flues for conducting the heat from furnaces to the several 
rooms in the house, being much siiperior to tin, for this pur- 
ix>se,.as they cannot rust or communicate fire to the wood- 
work through which they pass. 

Insurance companies recognize the additional safety se- 
cured by the use of these flue linings, by insuring buildings 
thus protected at lower rates than they otherwise would. 

These goods commend themselves to all who examine 
them, and have grown into favor very rapidly in the past 
few years. Several cities have ordinances compelling their 
use in all new buildings, and there can be little doubt that 
such a policy will become general so soon as their utility 
shall become generally understood. 

* $ 

24 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Round and Square Flue Linings. 






Inside 


OuUlde 


Form. 


Price. 


Openings 
orTe, 


Weight, 


Mce/mrr. 


McMon. 




per foot. 


each. 


per foot. 


5} in. 


7 in. 


Bound. 


cts. 




12 lbs. 


0* in. 


8 in. 


Bound. 


cts. 




14 lbs. 


8A in. 


10 in. 


Bound. 


cts. 




18 lbs. 


•7 x7 in. 


9x9 in 


Square. 


cts. 




25 lbs. 


71s7» in. 


9x9 in. 


Square. 


cts. 




20 lbs. 



* Thin size of sqnare pipe Is one inch in thickness, and is made with 
R*b»te Sockets, as shown in the- illustration. 



Cast Iron Rings. 





*- 



In One Piece. In Two Pieces. 

Price, each, cents. 

These Rings are nsed to hold iu place our Chimney Pipe. 
We keep in stock of both styles, three sizes, or to fit our 5, 6 
and 8-inch pipe. When ordering, if you require rings for 5 
inch pipe, order 5-inch rings, in one or two pieces, as desired. 

25 



-* 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



"* 



Terra Cotta Chimney Caps. 

These Caps nt our 5, 6, and 8 Inch Chimney Pipe, 




P]«in, Open Top 

No. 27,5inch 

No. 28, 6 inch 

No. 29, 8 inch 




No. 33, 5 inch. 
No. 34, 6 incb . 
No. 35, 8 inch. 



*- 



*To fit on Square Flue Pipe, 



26 



-*.i 



I 



*- 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Terra Cotta Chimney Bases. 




.*«mbrr» 1M, 10.% and 1M. 

~ Tbmti Bases are made •»> an to Hilda down over our Term Colt* Chim- 
ney lip*. They are used in connection with our Pip* Chimin ■-. 
form a finish at the base, over roof; also as a finish on top of a brick 
chimney, where a pipe is built into it. 

Care should be taken to cement the top of base, where it comes In 
contact with the pipe, so as to prevent leakage. 



X umber. 


Price. 


Size of Pipe which the 
Bues will lit. 


104 
105 
106 




5 inch. 

6 inch. 
8 inch. 




No. 113. DOUBLE B4SE. To place on Brick Chimneys. 

Either of the following tops will fit on this base, viz. : Nob. 102. 152, 
165, 168, 101, 107, 108, 109. 161, 166, 167 and 168. 



Number. 


Price. 


Outside 

Dimensions 

at 

Base. 


Inside divided into 

2 compartments. 

Dimensions 

of each. 


Height. 


113 




12 X 25 inches. 


10 1 11 inches. 


12 inches 



*- 



27 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



*" 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 

Oar Chimney Tops are made of superior Fire Clay, which 
we warrant to stand the weather in any climate. They are of 
a handsome buff-white color, and are highly ornamental, as 
well as useful for curing smoky chimneys, which are generally 
caused by wind blowing into the top of the chimney, and 
obstructing the ascending current of smoke. But these tops 
are made in such a shape as to throw up any transverse cur- 
rent of wind (see cuts), and cause it to pass over the flue 
instead of into it. 

The value cf Chimney Tops is too much underrated; be- 
sides giving an ornament and finish to the chimney, the 
benefits of their use are numerous; first lengthening the 
chimney, thereby improving the draught; second, separating 
the flues, thus preventing the smoke of one chimney from 
being blown down the one adjoining; third, protecting the 
top of the chimney from decay, caused by the gases of the 
coal, destroying the adhesion of the mortar to the bricks or 
stones, as will be readily observed by an examination of the 
tops of chimneys in use a few years; fourth, unlike galvan- 
ized Iron Tops, they are not affected by coal gas or the 
weather, and do not rust out, and require replacing every 
two or three years. 

Directions for Placing Tops on " Brick 
Chimneys. 

Our tops are easily applied to any common chimney, by 
taking off one or two courses of brick, sufficient to give the 
top a firm hold in the brick-work, and then replacing the 
brick about the base of the Chimney Top with cement. See 
that the top is set perfectly level. Many persons are under 
the impression that these tops will not retain their places in 
windy weather, and think they should be constructed so as 
to socket onto the chimney, but this is a mistake. If the 
proper pains are taken to set them on solid brick-work with 
cement, and in the manner above given, or even without 
enclosing their bases with the brick-work of the chimney, 
they will resist as heavy wind storms as the chimney itself. 



28 



11 *- 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 




No*. 101. 103, 103. 



Sen. l.-.l, I.V.". 153. 



MOS. 154, 155. 150- 







Outside 


Inside 


Inside 


Number. 


Price. 


Diameter 


Diameter 


Diameter 






a t Base. 


at Base. 


at Top. 


101 




10 inches. 


8 inches. 


5.1 inches. 


102 




11 inches. 


9 inches. 


6.', inches. 


103 




14 inches. 


12 inches 


8£ inches. 


151 




10 inches. 


8 inches. 


54- inches. 


162 




11 inches. 


9 inches. 


6i inches. 


153 




14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8i inches. 


164 




10 inches. 


8 inches. 


5i inches. 


156 




11 inches. 


9 inches. 


V>.\ inches. 


156 




14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8| inches, 



The tops on this page will fit onr 5, 6 and 8-inch Chim- 
ney Pipe. 



29 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



"* 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 



Hi 
911 

IIP 




Man. 157, 138, 159. 1 Sos. 160, 101, 162. Nog. 163, 164, 165. 



*" 







Outside 


Inside 


Inside 


Number, 


Price. 


Diameter 


Diameter 


Diameter 






at Base. 


at Base. 


at Top. 


157 




10 inches. 


8 inches. 


5£ inches. 


158 




11 inches. 


9 inches. 


6i inches. 


159 




14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8J inches. 


160 




10 inches. 


8 inches. 


o. 1 , inches. 


161 




11 inches. 


9 inches 


6£ inches. 


162 




14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8£ inches. 


163 




10 inches. 


8 inches. 


5 J inches. 


164 




11 inches. 


9 inches. 


6£ inches. 


165 




14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8£ inches. 



The tops on this page will fit our 5, 6 and 8-inch chimney 
pipe. 

30 



-* 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 








Outside 


Inside 


Inside 


Number. 


Price. 


Diameter 


Diameter 


Diameter 






at Base. 


at Base. 


at Top. 


166 




1*2 inches. 


10 inches. 


ti\ inches. 


167 




12 inches. 


10 inches. 


f>A inches. 


168 




12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6£ inches. 



The tops on this page will fit our 6-inch chimney pipe. 



31 



-M 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 




S!o. 13J. 




Number. 


Price. 


Outside 
Diameter 
at Base. 


Inside 
Diameter 
at Base. 


Inside 
Diameter 
at Top. 


137 

138 


$ 


14 inches. 
14 inches. 


12 inches. 
12 inches. 


8J inches. 
3] inches. 



*- 



The tops on this page will fit our 8-inch chimney pipe. 
We have tops that will fit any size of chimney flue. 



32 



-* 






► 4- 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops 
if 





Number 


Price. 


. Outside 

; ■ . .. tei 
at Base. 


Inside 
Diameter 

at Base. 


Inside 
Diameter 
at Top. 


136 




14 iucbes. 
14 inches . 


12 inches. 
12 inches. 


S\ inches. 
8J inches. 



*- 



Our " Antidown Draught Tops" will cure Smoky Chim- 
neys. 

The tops described on this page -will fit our S-inch chim- 
ney pipe. 



33 



-* 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



-*.i 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 



I 



Hi 



Numbers 

l'.'o, r.'i. 128, 123 and 124. 



7F IJ F1M 




Numbers 
130, 131 ami 134. 







Outside 


Inside 


Inside 


Number. 


Price. 


Dimensions 


Dimensions 


Diameter 






at Base. 


at Base. 


at Top. 


120 




8x 8 inches. 


6x 6 inches. 


6' inches. 


121 




8x10 " 


6x 8 


6* " 


122 




8x12 


6x10 " 


6J " 


123 




8x14 


6x12 •• 


6J " 


124 




10x10 " 


8x 8 " 


el « . 


130 




10x14 " 


8x12 " 


8J " 


131 




12x12 


10x10 " 


Si " 


134 




10x20 " 


8x18 " 


8* " 



34 



-* 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 




Nod. I •».',. 126. 12}, 128 and 129. 



Son. 132, 133 mid 135. 







Outside 


Inside 


Inside 


Number. 


Price. 


Dimensions 


Dimensions 


Diameter 






at Base, 


at Base. 


at Top. 


125 




8x 8 inches. 


fix inches. 


djs inches. 


136 




8x 10 inches. 


C x 8 inches. 


6* inches. 


1*27 




8 x 12 inches. 


6 x 10 inches. 


G\ inches. 


128 




8 x l-i inches. 


6 x 12 inches. 


C& Inches. 


129 




10 x 10 Inches. 


8x8 inches. 


64 inches. 


132 




10 x 14 inches. 


8 x 12 inches. 


8* Inches. 


133 




12 x 12 inches. 


10 x 10 inches. 


8i inches. 


ids 




10 x 20 inches. 


8 x 18 inches. 


S\ Inches. 



f*- 



35 



-* 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



-i.i 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 




ISlErfrf 




The square base or bottom portion, of these tops, also the 
tops on pages37, 39, 40, and 41, are made one foot in length, 
so that they can be erected on a -brick chimney, with a cou- 
ple of courses of brick placed around them (see page ), 
and leave sufficient of the base exposed so as to make a 
neat finish to the chimney. 



*- 



Number. 


Price. 


Outside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 
Diameter 
at Top. 


140 

141 




10x10 inches. 
12x12 inches. 


8Jx 8J inches. 
lO^xlOJ inches. 


6 J inches. 
8£ inches 



36 



-* 






\h 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 



So. 142. 



142 
143 




Outside Dimen- 
sions at Base. 



10x10 inches. 
12x12 inches. 



37 



Inside Dimenionss 
at Base. 



8ix 8A inches 
KMxlOJE inches. 



Inside Diam- 
eter at Top. 



6i inches. 
S| inches. 



-* 



t/f- 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 



-*.< 




■■ M 







Outside 


Inside 


inside 


Number. 


Price. 


Iiiameter 


Diameter 


Diameter 






at Base. 


at Base. 


at Top. 


107 




12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6 J inches. 


108 




12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6 inches. 


109 




12 inches. 


10J inches. 


7 inches. 



The Tops on this page will fit our 6-inch Chimney Pipe. 



*" 



-M 



38 




ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 




— i> 





No. 11*. 



Number. 


Price. 


Outside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Top. 


Ill 
112 




14x14 inches. 
12x12 inches 


12x12 inches. 
10x10 inches. 


8x8 inches. 
6x6 inches. 



*- 



We have other styles than those shown in this Catalogue, 
and can make any size or style wanted. 



39 



i.t- 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 






to 



I J 



a 




No. 145. 



Number. 


Price. 


Outside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Top. 


144 
145 




14x14 inches. 
16x16 inches. 


12x12 inches. 
14x14 inches. 


8 in. round. 
8x8 inches. 



Chimneys capped -with Terra Cotta Tops haYe an archi- 
tectural appearance, the top bricks are protected from the 
weather, and the draught is greatly improved. 



40 



-* 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TO^S. 





Numl*r. 


Price. 


Outside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Base. 


Inside 

Dimensions 

at Top. 


140 

147 




14 inches. 
12x12 inches. 


12 inches. 
10x10 inches. 


9 inches. 
7x7 inches. 



We will guarantee the material, workmanship, and 
style of our Tops, as superior to any manufactured on 
this Coast. 



*" 



41 



-* 



IB- 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



"* 





@J3iS^ ^Bi8Sij^ _ 

No. 218. 

Improved Flower Pots and Saucers. 

Our improved Flower Pots and Saucers far exceed the old 
style in strength, uniformity of shape, etc. These pots are 
of a light yellow color, made of a clay much superior to that 
which is usually put into such goods. As will be seen in 
the cut, they are made so that the shoulder of one rests on 
the edge of the other, thus preventing the wedging of one 
into the other, which is the main cause of breakage in 
transit. 

For packing, the improved pot requires forty per cent 
less space than the old-style. 



PRICE LIST. 



2 in. Pots. 

3 in. Pots. 

4 in. Pots. 

5 in. Pots . 

6 in. Pots. 

7 in. Pots. 

8 in. Pots. 

9 in. Pots. 
10 in. Pots. 
12 in. Pots. 



per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 



SAUCERS. 



3 in, Saucers, 

4 in. Saucers, 

5 in. Saucers, 

6 in. Saucers, 

7 in. Saucers, 

8 in. Saucers, 

9 in. Saucers, 
10 in. Saucers, 
12 in. Saucers, 



per 100 
per 100 
per 1C0 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 
per 100 



^W When ordering our Improved Pots, if you also re- 
quire the Saucers be particular to state it in your order . 
Packing of Flower Pots and Saucers, extra. 



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42 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



UNPAINTED FLOWER POTS. 




No. 223. 

Shingled 
Pot and Saucer. 

No. 222. « in Per doi. $... 
'• ■■ 6 In.. 
" 8 in.. 



No. 21G. 

Fluted Pot, 
with Saucer attached 

Xo. 216. lln.Per doz. $ 

" " Oln.. " 

" •' 8In.. " 



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43 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



-M 




No. aio. 

Quaker Pot & Saucer. 

Painted. 

No. 210, i In., per doz. $ 

" " •' " 



Vt- 



No. 305. 

Rustic Pot & Saucer. 
Decorated. 

No. 205, 4 in., per doz. $ 

" " 5 " " 



44 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



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TERRA COTTA VASES. 




No. 13. Width 13 In. 
■• 13. •• 17 In. 



Nob. 13 and 13. 
Height, 14 in. Price. 






Nob. 1 to 5. 




No. 


PRICE. EACH. 


WIDTH AT TOP. 


HEIGHT. 


1 
2 
3 
4 
S 




13 Inches. 

15 

17 

20 

23 


19 inches. 

13 

15 

18 

20 



45 



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GLADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



-H> J 



TERRA COTTA VASES. 




No. 15. 

"Width , 11 inohes. Height, 21 inches. Price, $. , 




*- 



No. 24. 

Width, 18 inches. Height, 22 inches, Price, $. 

46 



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ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Hj ( 



TERRA COTTA VASE. 




No. «8. 

Egyptian Vase and Pedestal. 

Width, 2G inches, height, 42 inches price, 

EGYPTIAN VASE —Copy of a Vase found in the ruins 
of Thebes. Tliongh broken in many pieces, on placing the 
fragments together it was found to be entire, and is now in 
the British Musenm. Antiquarians think it more than 
3,000 years old. 



47 



ii~ 



GL ADDING, McBEAN & CO., 



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TERRA COTTA VASE AND PEDESTAL. 




Width, 21 inches, height, 18 inches price. 



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No. C5. 

Pedestal. 

Width, 16 inches, height, 20 inches price, 

48 



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'.D CATALOGUE. 



ARC 



LL TERRA COTTA. 

and K 






u 



=T8T^ 



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49 



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*r 



GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 
Window Cap, Cornice and Moulding. 



_I\ 



OPENI 
RAD-'I 




s\ 



■HHHfil!^ 



No. 430. 3 Ft. 9 In.High.7In.Projection.$ _ PerFqot. 



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